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Topic: PMC 2006, Day 2: Bourne to Provincetown, 78 Miles

Messages: (15) 1


Author: Seth Dillingham

Date:8/9/2006

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# 5632

PMC 2006, Day 2: Bourne to Provincetown, 78 Miles

PMC LogoSunday, August 6, 2006

Whoo! Three days in a row, and I'm up with the alarm clock at some ridiculous hour (read: "before 7 am").

I told Mike yesterday that I'd meet them all by the bikes today at 5 a.m., but later I was reminded that anyone who is staying off campus is NOT to ride back over the bridge to the MMA. (Since it's not a group start on Sunday, it's no big deal.) I called Steve a few minutes after 5 to let him know I'd just meet them at the first water stop.

Like this story? Check out the comments in the forum! Participants have included other PMC riders and even one of the long-term PMC Road Crew volunteers.

When I got off the phone with Steve I was ready to go, and I even had my gloves and shades! The bike was disassembled in the back of the car (setting up the bike rack last night was going to be too much hassle), but it only took a few seconds to put it back together. I rode out, and found to my surprise that everyone coming off the Bourne Bridge rode — literally — right past the hotel entrance. Cool!

Knowing they had a five minute ride to the bridge, and then probably ten minutes to crawl over the bridge, I decided to wait there instead of riding ahead. There were two other guys doing the same thing. I said good morning, and one of them just stared at me intently. I cocked an eyebrow, and he slowly... pointed... to... his... head.

Aw nuts. In a flash, I rode back to the hotel, clomped back inside, clomped down the hall, knocked loudly on the door (and heard something like, "oh brother, he can never just leave for a ride!"), thanked my sweet wife for waking up this time, grabbed the keys to the car, clomped back outside to the car, GRABBED MY HELMET from the back (right next to where my bike had been), threw the keys onto the chair on the patio by the room's sliding glass doors (Corinne was watching, so she knew where to get them), and rode back to the waiting point.

Paul on Bourne Bridge See what I mean by, "Classic Seth?" I really don't even get upset about these things anymore.

When I returned to my waiting spot, the rider who pointed at his head said, "Hey, that's better." Then he started chatting with the rider on his other side. The third guy said, "There are a lot of nice bikes here this weekend." (Certainly true.) Pointing-man's response? "There are a lot more nice bikes behind me than there are in front of me." Ugh. What a snot.

Steve had said they were ready to go when we spoke on the phone, so I figured that I must have missed them. I waited a few more minutes. When they didn't show I decided to chase them down. Just like last year.

I averaged 22 mph for most of the canal road. Not a blistering pace, but fast enough that I was pretty sure I'd catch up with them at or before the first water stop. The canal road is a lot of fun: it's almost totally flat, so the challenge is finding a pace you can maintain for the whole length that won't leave you burned out for the remaining 70 miles. Last year's 24 mph was a little too high, 22 felt just right.

If you ride fast on this road, you will inevitably "pick up a tail." I was no exception (and people do seem to enjoy drafting me). I knew there were riders back there, I could hear their gears shifting and other little sounds.

Two thirds of the way along the canal road, a voice bellowed from behind me, "Seth! I can't maintain this pace!" Oh good grief. "I was trying to catch you!" I bellowed back to Steve. (He wasn't serious about not being able to maintain the pace, but he was right that there was no need to push it now that we were all together.)

When I was leaving my post at the bridge's exit, they were almost there and had seen me. So, they chased me down. I had no idea they were there until Steve called out. (Did I mention the problem with us all looking the same from a distance? Different jerseys today, a lot more variation, but at this point it was still pretty dark.)

Just a few miles after the canal road is the climb up to the service road that runs parallel to Route 6 for miles.

Grr. I just spent a bunch of time setting up a little Google Earth Fly-Through for the first leg of the ride... only to have Google Earth crash just as I finished. Lost all of my work. OY! Would have been a cool download.

This climb is really the first pain of the day. I warned Paul about it, and then a little later Mike did the same, pointing out that the riders ahead would tend to bunch up because the hill slows everyone down so much, so he should be prepared.

My next words were, "Oh my word, that kid climbs like a monkey going up a tree." Zoom. It was beautiful, and he didn't slow down until he was at the top.

I was feeling GREAT, so I took off after and almost caught him just before the top. The difference, though, was that I burned my fuse down a lot more than he did. (If he was five pounds lighter, he'd literally be half my size.) I went up that hill at much closer to maximum effort than he did.

For the Fun of It

If you look back over this site, you'll see this is my sixth year and that cycling is one of the things I've always written about. Sometimes it's technical, sometimes it's about the sport, but there's one constant: I ride because I love to ride. There's nothing more to it. Yes, I'm competitive sometimes, but I'm not a racer. Yes, I want to ride better, but that's just because I like how it feels to ride really fast.

Seriously. If you think there's anything more to it, please point to the evidence. On the other hand I have links from this site's first year that say the same as the previous paragraph, but in fewer words. Like this:

I'm a cyclist. I love to ride, on the road, for long distances and as fast as I can. This is where I keep track of my rides, and my performance.

(I feel like that was written by someone else, or in a previous life, but the words still ring true for me.)

Why bring this up now? Because riding with Paul really "made the weekend" for me. In *my* opinion — and that's all this is — we have a very similar attitude about riding. It's simple: we do it because it's fun!

I know Paul's a competitor (as am I), and he'll probably go on to be a racer (which I didn't and won't). But this weekend, as I watched him bounce his way up the hills (he rides a little like Thomas Voeckler, but he's just getting started so we won't hold that against him), I felt like he was a kindred spirit. He ran fast and free when he wanted to, while at the same time trying to not get too far ahead of his Dad.

It's weird that I came to this conclusion, as I barely knew Paul at all before this weekend, but that's how I see it. When other riders are panicking about maintaining the pace, or are hollering at someone (like me) to "hold the line" as if we were fighting trench warfare, I just wanted to go faster and farther. It looked to me like Paul did, too.

(This isn't meant to be a comment against ANYONE or anything.)

Paul and Seth I convinced Steve to stop at the first water stop, because I hadn't eaten much of anything that morning. I grabbed a pbj, some melon, and more gatorade. Steve and Mike went to use the facilities. Paul moved over into that area to wait for them. When I was done eating, I couldn't find any of them. (What's that... the third or fourth time?) I looked around for awhile, and saw no sign of them.

After camping by the exit for a minute, I saw a guy in Steve's jersey way up ahead, riding slow and looking around. I wasn't sure it was him, but it could have been (the jersey was an old PMC jersey, there were a couple dozen of that model around on Sunday), and I had already decided not to waste a lot of time looking for people who might not be there.

I left, and quickly caught the draft of a pair of tandems going about 24 mph on the flats. They didn't want me to work with them, so I just sat back there riding pretty easily for ten miles, until one of them was worn out and the other took a side road. (I don't know where they went, but I saw them again later.) A few minutes later I hooked onto the tail end of a fairly slow team. To make matters worse, there's was one very inexperienced rider between me and this team, and he greatly amplified the accordion effect that's so annoying about riding on the end of a long paceline (ride hard, hit the brakes, ride hard, hit the brakes).

Remember Jack, from 2004? He was there again this year, at the same park. Taller, still healthy, and now holding a sign that said he was ten thanks to us. (Compare the pictures: it looks like his pants from two years ago became this year's shorts!)

Steve, Paul and Mike pulled in a few minutes after I did. Steve said, "Ugh. Paul pulled almost the whole way here." Paul's first words to me were, "How did we not catch you!? We didn't go below 25 mph even on the hills!"

See, that's what I mean. I just love that! He's so enthusiastic! Never mind that they couldn't possibly have been going that fast... it's just so cool that Paul was willing to dump it all to catch me, just for the fun of it. (Of course, in a couple of years when he's stronger he actually will catch me if I only have a couple minutes lead. Oh well.)

After Nickerson State Park, we hit the first set of rail trails for a few miles. Steve and Mike were ahead of us, and we had a small group of poke-a-longs between us. We got around them, and started trading pulls to catch up with them... when my tools all fell out of my saddle bag (which has a hole at one end, and is going to be replaced soon). They were junky old tools that need to be replaced, but Paul refused to let them go. He actually got off his bike and walked back for them while I stood there shaking my head.

We cranked it up again and I told Paul to just hold my wheel until we'd caught his Dad (who I knew wouldn't go too far once he realized his boy wasn't right there with him). When we did catch them, just past the end of the rail trail, Steve said, "Paul, are you ok?!" (That made me smile.)

There was a second set of rail trails. Like the canal road, these "roads" are fun because there's almost no other traffic, the road is pretty good (except for where the tree roots have buckled up the road), and it's quite flat. Zoom, we sped along at high speed, but ha to call out loudly at every intersection because of these huge yellow poles right in the middle of the trail. Hit one of them at speed, and your weekend is over.

At the very end of the last rail trail, there was some confusion about the right hand turn and someone stopped and someone else didn't... and the rider in front of me lost his balance and just fell over to the right, his feet still clipped in. (We've all done, or at least seen, that move at least once before.) I gave him a hand to help him up: he just stayed clipped in, I pulled him up, and he rode off. Steve and Paul didn't wait, though, and so Mike and I didn't see them again until the last water stop at Wellfleet Academy.

At Wellfleet, after recharging my bottles, Steve and bunch of the Huckleberries had their pictures taken on the "ice couch". They were all wearing goofy party hats, and sitting on (what looked like) bearskin rugs laid out over the ice bags... it was such a goofy shot that it made me think, "What happens on the cape, stays on the cape."

Steve wanted to ride out with the Huckleberries, so we all returned to our bikes and moved out onto the road... when someone realized that we weren't all there (double entendre?). I didn't like being stopped in the middle of the road, so I told them I'd coast until they caught up. As soon as I turned the corner (at the bottom of the hill) onto Route 6, Paul caught up with me! "What are you doing here?" I asked in surprise. He didn't know what to say, so I told him to just coast along with me until they showed up. I hope Steve didn't think I'd kidnapped his son or something. ;-) I told Paul one of us might "hear about" him leaving without his Dad, but when Steve caught up all I heard (or imagined?) was a slight note of frustration when he said, "OK, I'm on now, Paul."

I still felt pretty good, so I tried to keep the paceline moving at over 20. As we approached the Provincetown line, Paul and I were in front and Steve yelled "Go Paul, go!" I didn't know what the heck was going on, but I *think* Paul sprinted for the town line all by himself. Like father, like son!

Shortly afterward, I rode off the front of the line without even knowing it, and someone grumped at me about it when I slowed down again to let them catch up. The Huckleberries were gone, and it was just back to the four of us. Later, Mike and I did it again (except Mike suddenly turned into a bullet, hitting 30 on the flats for a few seconds).

At the top of the last dune, we noodled for a while until the Davis's caught us. We all wanted Paul to finish first.

The huge cheering crowd at the Provincetown Inn finish line always puts a smile on my face, but even better was watching Steve and Paul ride over the line, Steve holding Paul's left hand up in the air and smiling so big I thought his face would split. When he could catch his breath, he bellowed "He's 15 years old!" and the crowd cheered again, even louder.

Most of the 2006 Huckleberries Hey Paul! Congratulations on your first PMC! You're a lot of fun to ride with, and I hope you never lose your enthusiasm for just riding for the fun of it. (And congrats to Steve, as I know you've been very excited about this day for a long time!)

The rest of the Huckleberries showed up a couple minutes later, and we all had our pictures taken.

Highlights from the rest of the day:

  • I didn't send a bag to the P-town finish this year, since there was really no point! Corinne was going to meet me at the family finish, so I couldn't even take a shower here as I still had two more miles to ride.

  • I moseyed over to the food tent, ate some lunch, and repeatedly tried to call Corinne. It just kept going to voicemail.

  • Finally saw Mark and Andy, they'd been back for a while (of course, they're very fast). Tony was there too, but hadn't been back for quite so long.

  • Finally talked to Corinne, she'd been at the Family finish since a little before 10. It was now 10:50, I'd been done for almost an hour. If I had ridden straight to the FF after having our pictures taken, I probably would have beaten her there, but it would have been close. In stead, she got to wait for an hour. (Every other year, she's been stuck in traffic so I didn't hurry to get there this year. So, of course, she got there on time.)

  • The ride to the FF was uneventful. It took me longer to find Corinne sitting on the back of the car in the parking lot than it did for me to ride over there.

  • The drive home was pretty uneventful, also. We stopped at some roadside seafood stand for lunch (there are at least a few of those on the cape, you know), and at a gas station at the Sagamore Bridge for gas. Oh, and at the Dunkin Donuts on exit 6 and exit 3 for Coolattas (because the first one's machine was broken!)

  • I went to bed at 5, woke up briefly to eat some food put in front of me by my loving wife, and then went back to sleep again until just before the alarm went off on Monday morning. Ahhhhhh... almost fourteen hours.

Stats: 78.24 miles (125.9 km) in 3h 57' 31" for an average speed of 19.76 mph (31.82 kph).

And for the whole weekend:

Summary of rides from 8/4/06 to 8/6/06
Rides: 3 Miles: 283.13 miles (455.65 km) Time: 14h 28m 42s
Avg. Speed: 19.55 mph (31.47 kph) Avg. Miles: 94.37 miles (151.87 km) Avg. Time: 4h 49m 34s
Fastest 19.76 mph (31.8 kph) Miles: 78.24 miles (125.91 km) Date: 8/6/06
Slowest 19.44 mph (31.29 kph) Miles: 93.45 miles (150.39 km) Date: 8/4/06

One last thing:

A really big thank you and an "I love you" to my wonderful wife, who (once again) schlepped all of our stuff all over the state. We know we want to do things differently next time (whether that's next year or the year after), but I really appreciate everything you did for me this year. Again.

[Top]


Author: Steve Davis - Office

Date:8/10/2006

Permalink Icon

# 5635

Re: PMC 2006, Day 2: Bourne to Provincetown, 78 MIles

Hey, that was fun to read. Paul quickly read it before heading out to an
orthodontist appointment and he was beaming at your description of his
riding.

We had a lot of fun riding with you too. As always.

My favorite part of the ride was crossing the line with Paul. We were told
by several people that NECN showed all four of us coming under the finish
banner in PTown. They also had a brief interview with Paul talking about
his grandfather (Jim Schlageter) and grandmother (my mom, Nancy).

The video can be seen here

All for now,

Steve
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Seth Dillingham"
To: "TruerWords" 
Sent: Wednesday, August 09, 2006 11:48 PM
Subject: [tw] PMC 2006, Day 2: Bourne to Provincetown, 78 MIles [Msg#5632]

> <http://www.truerwords.net/5632>
> --------------------------------
>
> Sunday, August 6, 2006
>
> Whoo! Three days in a row, and I'm up with the alarm clock at some
> ridiculous hour (read: "before 7 am").
>
> I told Mike yesterday that I'd meet them all by the bikes today at 5 a.m.,
> but later I was reminded that anyone who is staying off campus is NOT to
> ride back over the bridge to the MMA. (Since it's not a group start on
> Sunday, it's not big deal.) I called Steve a few minutes after 5 to let him
> know I'd just meet them at the first water stop.
>
> When I got off the phone with Steve I was ready to go, and I even had my
> gloves and shades! The bike was disassembled in the back of the car (setting
> up the bike rack last night was going to be too much hassle), but it only
> took a few seconds to put it back together. I rode out, and found to my
> surprise that everyone coming off the Bourne Bridge rode — literally — right
> past the hotel entrance. Cool!
>
> Knowing they had a five minute ride to the bridge, and then probably ten
> minutes to crawl over the bridge, I decided to...

[Top]


Author: Pickle-Ft

Date:8/10/2006

Permalink Icon

# 5638

RE: PMC 2006, Day 2: Bourne to Provincetown, 78 MIles

Thanks for the link, Steve. Not only did I get to see you and Paul but I
got to see MY kid on TV! LOL



Seth's Mom



-------Original Message-------



From: Steve Davis - Office



The video can be seen here:

http://www.boston.com/partners/worldnow/necn
html?catID=80769&clipid=902445&autoStart=true&mute=false&continuous=true


[Top]


Author: Seth Dillingham

Date:8/10/2006

Permalink Icon

# 5640

RE: PMC 2006, Day 2: Bourne to Provincetown, 78 MIles

On 8/10/06, Steve Davis - Office said:

> Hey, that was fun to read.  Paul quickly read it before heading out to an

> orthodontist appointment and he was beaming at your description of his
> riding.

Hope *you* weren't bothered by the Voeckler reference. ;-) His bounciness really did remind me of him.

> We had a lot of fun riding with you too.  As always.

:-)

> My favorite part of the ride was crossing the line with Paul.  We were told
> by several people that NECN showed all four of us coming under the finish
> banner in PTown.  They also had a brief interview with Paul talking about
> his grandfather (Jim Schlageter) and grandmother (my mom, Nancy).
> 
> The video can be seen here

Steve, you realize THAT video is the one which shows all four of us finishing, right? :-)

I still think you need to talk all five of your boys into riding when they're all old enough, even if it's just once. They could carry you to the finish. ;-)

Seth

[Top]


Author: Steve Davis - Office

Date:8/11/2006

Permalink Icon

# 5647

Re: PMC 2006, Day 2: Bourne to Provincetown, 78 MIles

In order for Paul to ride more like Voekler, he'll have to get a full zip jersey and unzip it all the way so that it flaps behind him in the wind... Comparing my kid to a guy that wore the yellow jersey in the Tour doesn't bother me in the least ;-)

I did know that the video showed us crossing the line. That's two years in a row that they've caught us finishing. Pretty cool!

Oh, and there is no way that my "5" boys will join me in the PMC since Sandy and I only have four. Believe me when I tell you that we're done having kids! Yikes, I can't even imagine... Still, it would be fun having all the kids join me, but by the time Peter is old enough to ride Billy will probably have a $10,000 minimum fundraising requirement.

So far, Paul and I have raised almost $10,000. He's done $4,000 by writing to his friend's families and his teachers. Pretty good for somone without much of a network.

I'm hoping to get out for a ride this afternoon.

Steve
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Seth Dillingham"
To: "TruerWords"
Sent: Thursday, August 10, 2006 10:08 PM
Subject: RE: [tw] PMC 2006, Day 2: Bourne to Provincetown, 78 MIles 
[Msg#5640]

> <http://www.truerwords.net/5640>
> --------------------------------
> 
> On 8/10/06, Steve Davis - Office said:
>  
>> Hey, that was fun to read.  Paul quickly read it before heading out to an
>> orthodontist appointment and he was beaming at your description of his
>> riding.
>  
> Hope *you* weren't bothered by the Voeckler reference. ;-) His bounciness
> really did remind me of him.
> 
>> We had a lot of fun riding with you too.  As always.
>  
> :-)
> 
>> My favorite part of the ride was crossing the line with Paul.  We were told
>> by several people that NECN showed all four of us coming under the finish
>> banner in PTown.  They also had a brief interview with Paul talking about
>> his grandfather (Jim Schlageter) and grandmother (my mom, Nancy).
>> 
>> The video can be seen here.
>  
> Steve, you realize THAT video is the one which shows all four of us
> finishing, right? :-)
>  
> I still think you need to talk all five of your boys into riding when they're
> all old enough, even if it's just once. They could carry you to the finish. ;-)
>  
> Seth

[Top]


Author: Chris

Date:8/10/2006

Permalink Icon

# 5639

RE: PMC 2006, Day 2: Bourne to Provincetown, 78 MIles

Any idea what time you passed along the 5 mile Rail Trail from Eastham to Wellfleet?  Reason I ask is that I'd love to hear your feedback on that section.  What kind of traffic, how many people in your group, etc.

During mid-day, we had several bad accidents there.  One where a guy on  Trek Carbon bike struck a post and literally snapped the bike in half.

The road crew is pushing for a more scenic route that is easier to patrol with wider roads (you'd basically do the tunnel under Rt 6 and then off at the next intersection) any feedback would be helpful.

Any PMC riders welcome to comment. 

Chris

[Top]


Author: Seth Dillingham

Date:8/10/2006

Permalink Icon

# 5641

RE: PMC 2006, Day 2: Bourne to Provincetown, 78 MIles

On 8/10/06, Chris said:

> Any idea what time you passed along the 5 mile Rail Trail from Eastham to
> Wellfleet?  Reason I ask is that I'd love to hear your feedback on that
> section.  What kind of traffic, how many people in your group, etc.

Well, we reached the Wellfleet Academy at about 8:40...? I think. (Steve, do you agree? I'm figuring that we finished at about 9:50. An hour back to when we left Wellfleet Academy is 8:50, and we were there for about 10 minutes.)

We averaged a little under 20 mph, though we were a little over 20 mph on the rail trail itself.

Does that answer your question? I'm not sure how far it is from the Academy back to the rail trail, but if you know that then you should be able to work out the time. :-)

The traffic was light.

There were four in our group. Three of us are experienced riders, and were comfortable passing the groups ahead of us by giving them lots of very loud advanced warning. (Did I mention that a couple of us have nice bellows? ON YOUR LEFT!!! I forgot to mention this in the write-up, but one woman actually said that she thought it was the voice of God.)

My recollection is a little fuzzy on this point, but my guess is that in those 5 miles we passed less than 50 riders. (And, uh... we passed everyone we saw.)

> During mid-day, we had several bad accidents there.  One where a guy on=20
> Trek Carbon bike struck a post and literally snapped the bike in half.

Oh my. Like I said before, "hit one of those, and it's the end of your weekend." Snapping your bike in half would truly suck, though, especially a really expensive carbon frame.

Was the rider ok? You didn't mention it, so I assume he was, but I'm not sure how you could do that much damage to the bike and come out of it unscathed yourself.

He has to be doing better than the guy who collided with the motorcycle. Ick.

> The road crew is pushing for a more scenic route that is easier to patrol
> with wider roads (you'd basically do the tunnel under Rt 6 and then off at
> the next intersection) any feedback would be helpful.

I understand that this is a difficult situation for the crew. I did see one flat on that road, and it was a long way to the next or previous crew van. In fact (and this is goofy, I know), I was feeling a little protective of Paul — especially when we were separated from Steve and Mike =94 and at that point I didn't really like the rail trail so much.

It's not that the trail is any more dangerous than the open road. In fact, in some ways it's probably less dangerous (except for those stupid poles!). The problem is that if and when something does go wrong, you're basically on your own. Minor stuff like a flat tire is no big deal, but with thousands of riders you're bound to have more serious problems, too.

I hope they listen to the road crew and modify the route next year. I understand why they did it this way, this time, but I think it could have been better. A longer route (by a few miles) with better support coverage is going to be safer overall.

Seth

[Top]


Author: Steve Davis - Office

Date:8/11/2006

Permalink Icon

# 5646

Re: PMC 2006, Day 2: Bourne to Provincetown, 78 MIles

I think you're right about the time we were on the rail trail.

I expected the trail to be a lot worse. I didn't find it bad at all and almost prefered it to the route last year. Certainly, the root sections were not nearly as bad as I was led to believe. I think that part of the trail is going to be repaved in the fall too.

I'm not a big fan of bellowing out "ON YOUR LEFT" unless the person is squirelly or riding in the middle of the road. Otherwise, I don't see that it really does much except annoy the people we pass. Sometimes, it seems the people getting passed look over their left shoulders and inadvertently drift toward our paceline. One of the most memorable jerseys of the weekend was worn by an older woman. It read, "I know you're on my left!". Made me smile.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Seth Dillingham"
To: "TruerWords"
Sent: Thursday, August 10, 2006 10:54 PM
Subject: RE: [tw] PMC 2006, Day 2: Bourne to Provincetown, 78 Miles
[Msg#5641]
> <http://www.truerwords.net/5641>
> --------------------------------
>
> On 8/10/06, Chris said:
>
>> Any idea what time you passed along the 5 mile Rail Trail from Eastham to
>> Wellfleet?  Reason I ask is that I'd love to hear your feedback on that
>> section.  What kind of traffic, how many people in your group, etc.
>
> Well, we reached the Wellfleet Academy at about 8:40...? I think. (Steve, do
> you agree? I'm figuring that we finished at about 9:50. An hour back to=20
> when we left Wellfleet Academy is 8:50, and we were there for about 10
> minutes.)
>
> We averaged a little under 20 mph, though we were a little over 20 mph on
> the rail trail itself.
>
> Does that answer your question? I'm not sure how far it is from the Academy
> back to the rail trail, but if you know that then you should be able to=20
> work out the time. :-)
>
> The traffic was light.
>
> There were four in our group. Three of us are experienced riders, and were
> comfortable passing the groups ahead of us by giving them lots of very loud
> advanced warning. (Did I mention that a couple of us have nice bellows? ON
> YOUR LEFT!!! I forgot to mention this in the write-up, but one woman
> actually said that she thought it was the voice of God.)
>
> My recollection is a little fuzzy on this point, but my guess is that in
> those 5 miles we passed less than 50 riders. (And, uh... we passed everyone
> we saw.)
>
>> During mid-day, we had several bad accidents there.  One where a guy on=20
>> Trek Carbon bike struck a post and literally snapped the bike in half.
>
> Oh my. Like I said before, "hit one of those, and it's the end of your
> weekend." Snapping your bike in half would truly suck, though, especially a
> really expensive carbon frame.
>
> Was the rider ok? You didn't mention it, so I assume he was, but I'm not
> sure how you could do that much damage to the bike and come out of it
> unscathed yourself.
>
> He has to be doing better than the guy who collided with the motorcycle. Ick.
>
>> The road crew is pushing for a more scenic route that is easier to patrol
>> with wider roads (you'd basically do the tunnel under Rt 6 and then off at
>> the next intersection) any feedback would be helpful.
>
> I understand that this is a difficult situation for the crew. I did see=20
> one flat on that road, and it was a long way to the next or previous crew
> van. In fact (and this is goofy, I know), I was feeling a little protective
> of Paul — especially when we were separated from Steve and Mike =94 and at
> that point I didn't really like the rail trail so much.
>
> It's not that the trail is any more dangerous than the open road. In fact,
> in some ways it's probably less dangerous (except for those stupid poles!).
> The problem is that if and when something does go wrong, you're basically on
> your own. Minor stuff like a flat tire is no big deal, but with thousands of
> riders you're bound to have more serious problems, too.
>
> I hope they listen to the road crew and modify the route next year. I
> understand why they did it this way, this time, but I think it could have
> been better. A longer route (by a few miles) with better support coverage is
> going to be safer overall.
>
> Seth
>
--------------------------------
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[Top]


Author: Seth Dillingham

Date:8/11/2006

Permalink Icon

# 5648

RE: PMC 2006, Day 2: Bourne to Provincetown, 78 MIles

On 8/11/06, Steve Davis - Office said:

> I expected the trail to be a lot worse.  I didn't find it bad at all and
> almost prefered it to the route last year.  Certainly, the root sections
> were not nearly as bad as I was led to believe.  I think that part of the
> trail is going to be repaved in the fall too.

I agree that the trail was pretty nice, but I can also see how it could be a problem if you have a mechanical (or worse).

> I'm not a big fan of bellowing out "ON YOUR LEFT" unless the person is
> squirelly or riding in the middle of the road.  Otherwise, I don't see that
> it really does much except annoy the people we pass.  Sometimes, it seems=3D20
> the people getting passed look over their left shoulders and inadvertently
> drift toward our paceline.  One of the most memorable jerseys of the weekend
> was worn by an older woman.  It read, "I know you're on my left!".   Made me
> smile.

If the person was well outside of "my lane", I would say it quietly, just enough for them to know I'm there. People's minds drift sometimes, you know?

If the person was really close to my lane, suddenly in my lane, "squirrelly" (as you put it), or was himself coming up behind someone else quickly (suggesting he was about to switch lanes), I would say it louder so I could be sure he heard me.

If the person did something stupid (like jumping in front of me at the last second), or was really swerving/weaving badly, or startled me somehow ;-), I would bellow "ON YOUR LEFT!" like a car horn. Better safe than sorry.

I only had to bellow it a few times. The lady who thought she heard the "voice of God" was the one who jumped in front of me at the last second. She was in la-la land, poking along at half our speed, and I was pulling our group on the second rail trail. There was someone in front of her, but they weren't going any slower than she was... and suddenly she swerved in front of me AFTER I gave her the first version (the quiet one) of "on your left."

You may remember that on Saturday, we almost had a little accident when Mike was pulling. Someone came around us without saying anything, just as he was about to pull out to go around two other riders (I even know who they were!). He called out that he was going to pass them on the right, because we were moving quickly and it would have been more dangerous to slam on the brakes... but the guy who went around us on the left boxed them in also, and they got scared when they felt boxed in. I thought one of them was going to chase Mike down and punch him, even though Mike did the safest thing he could do under the circumstances.

(Does Mike ever NOT do the safest possible thing? Man he's easy to ride with.)

Seth

[Top]


Author: Steve Davis - Office

Date:8/11/2006

Permalink Icon

# 5649

Re: PMC 2006, Day 2: Bourne to Provincetown, 78 MIles

All good points.

One of the nice things about the PMC is the name tags that people tend to
hang from their saddle bags. Like you, I would try to say it quietly and I
would also use their name (e.g., "on your left, Seth"). Maybe it's stupid,
but I thought it seemed friendlier...

Another guy with a booming voice is Jim Boyko. One time we were out for a
ride early on a Saturday and passed this little old lady walking with her
little dog. Jim boomed out "ON YOUR LEFT" so loud she jumped about a foot
off the ground. In a way it was wicked funny, but in another way it was
just wicked. Still, I almost wet my pants from laughing so hard. Ever
since, I've been careful not to yell too loudly.

Mike is a very safe rider. I do recall the time he passed on the right and
thought (at the time) that it was a reckless move, but now see your point
about it being more dangerous to brake.

Not only is Mike great to ride with, so are you. My only complaint is that
when you want to "stretch your legs" and increase the speed by 3 or 4 miles
per hour in 3 or 4 pedal strokes it makes it tough to keep the paceline
moving smoothly. That's why I let you pull ahead on that stretch of road
leading into Provincetown. I figured if I jumped to stay up with you it
would be tough on the group as a whole. and especially on the guy that was
dropping back off the front. (or at least that's my excuse for not being
able to keep up with you there ;-).

My only other complaint about you is that when you get in your downhill tuck
I get nightmares. You see, I can't see around your big you know what. My
fear is that one day you'll stop short and I won't. The only way they'll
find me is to see my shoes sticking out the back of your shorts. I
mentioned this to David on the ferry and realized that several people were
eavesdropping when the guys behind us starting laughing uncontrollably...

I'm off for my ride now.

See ya


----- Original Message -----
From: "Seth Dillingham" <seth@macrobyte.net>
To: "TruerWords" <TruerWords-site@free-conversant.com>
Sent: Friday, August 11, 2006 3:53 PM
Subject: RE: [tw] PMC 2006, Day 2: Bourne to Provincetown, 78 MIles
[Msg#5648]


> <http://www.truerwords.net/5648>
> --------------------------------
>
> On 8/11/06, Steve Davis - Office said:
>
>> I expected the trail to be a lot worse. I didn't find it bad at all and
>> almost prefered it to the route last year. Certainly, the root sections
>> were not nearly as bad as I was led to believe. I think that part of the
>> trail is going to be repaved in the fall too.
>
> I agree that the trail was pretty nice, but I can also see how it could be
> a
> problem if you have a mechanical (or worse).
>
>> I'm not a big fan of bellowing out "ON YOUR LEFT" unless the person is
>> squirelly or riding in the middle of the road. Otherwise, I don't see
>> that
>> it really does much except annoy the people we pass. Sometimes, it
>> seems=3D20
>> the people getting passed look over their left shoulders and
>> inadvertently
>> drift toward our paceline. One of the most memorable jerseys of the
>> weekend
>> was worn by an older woman. It read, "I know you're on my left!". Made
>> me
>> smile.
>
> If the person was well outside of "my lane", I would say it quietly, just
> enough for them to know I'm there. People's minds drift sometimes, you
> know?
>
> If the person was really close to my lane, suddenly in my lane,
> "squirrelly"
> (as you put it), or was himself coming up behind someone else quickly
> (suggesting he was about to switch lanes), I would say it louder so I
> could be
> sure he heard me.
>
> If the person did something stupid (like jumping in front of me at the
> last
> second), or was really swerving/weaving badly, or startled me somehow ;-),
> I
> would bellow "ON YOUR LEFT!" like a car horn. Better safe than sorry.
>
> I only had to bellow it a few times. The lady who thought she heard the
> "voice
> of God" was the one who jumped in front of me at the last second. She was
> in
> la-la land, poking along at half our speed, and I was pulling our group on
> the
> second rail trail. There was someone in front of her, but they weren't
> going
> any slower than she was... and suddenly she swerved in front of me AFTER I
> gave her the first version (the quiet one) of "on your left."
>
> You may remember that on Saturday, we almost had a little accident when
> Mike
> was pulling. Someone came around us without saying anything, just as he
> was
> about to pull out to go around two other riders (I even know who they
> were!).
> He called out that he was going to pass them on the right, because we were
> moving quickly and it would have been more dangerous to slam on the
> brakes..
> but the guy who went around us on the left boxed them in also, and they
> got
> scared when they felt boxed in. I thought one of them was going to chase
> Mike
> down and punch him, even though Mike did the safest thing he could do
> under
> the circumstances.
>
> (Does Mike ever NOT do the safest possible thing? Man he's easy to ride
> with.)
>
> Seth
>
> --------------------------------
> Unsubscribe Instructions:
> <http://www.truerwords.net/mailinglist.html#unsubscribe>
>
>


[Top]


Author: Corinne

Date:8/11/2006

Permalink Icon

# 5650

Re: PMC 2006, Day 2: Bourne to Provincetown, 78 MIles


On Aug 11, 2006, at 5:27 PM, Steve Davis - Office wrote:

> My only other complaint about you is that when you get in your
> downhill tuck
> I get nightmares. You see, I can't see around your big you know what.

Hey, Mister!!! My husband does NOT have a big butt!

I did think Floyd had a big butt when I saw him riding in the Tour.
But Seth? Nah!

Corinne

[Top]


Author: Seth Dillingham

Date:8/11/2006

Permalink Icon

# 5652

RE: PMC 2006, Day 2: Bourne to Provincetown, 78 MIles

On 8/11/06, Steve Davis - Office said:

> My only complaint is that when you want to "stretch your legs" and increase
> the speed by 3 or 4 miles per hour in 3 or 4 pedal strokes it makes it tough
> to keep the paceline moving smoothly.

Thus, "HOLD THE LINE!!!" I knew you'd fess up eventually. ;-)

> That's why I let you pull ahead on that stretch of road leading into
> Provincetown.  I figured if I jumped to stay up with you it would be tough
> on the group as a whole. and especially on the guy that was dropping back
> off the front. (or at least that's my excuse for not being able to keep up
> with you there ;-).

Yee haw. :-)

Sometimes I just need to go. Don't you? (No, no, not like that. Settle down, children.)

> My only other complaint about you

Sorry, you can't have an "only complaint" followed immediately by another complaint. That's cheating.

> is that when you get in your downhill tuck I get nightmares.  You see, I
> can't see around your big you know what.  My fear is that one day you'll
> stop short and I won't.  The only way they'll find me is to see my shoes
> sticking out the back of your shorts.  I mentioned this to David on the
> ferry and realized that several people were eavesdropping when the guys
> behind us starting laughing uncontrollably...

You're not exactly parking on a pinhead, buddy.

Ok, ok, I had that coming for calling you Beef Jerky Man. :-)

Gotta be honest, this had me laughing again, a few times, on my ride this evening. You're responsible for slowing me down a little. But not much (as you'll see in a minute).

Seth

[Top]


Author: Steve Davis - Office

Date:8/12/2006

Permalink Icon

# 5654

Re: PMC 2006, Day 2: Bourne to Provincetown, 78 MIles

Actually, I think it is Mike that calls out "hold the line". That term is
usually used in races when a peloton is moving through a turn. To hold your
line means to stay in a predictable arc through the turn. When a cyclist
doesn't hold his line it usually means that a following rider runs out of
room and gets cut off in the turn.

When you start to jack rabbit off the front I usually just whimper.


----- Original Message -----
From: "Seth Dillingham" <seth@macrobyte.net>
To: "TruerWords" <TruerWords-site@free-conversant.com>
Sent: Friday, August 11, 2006 11:37 PM
Subject: RE: [tw] PMC 2006, Day 2: Bourne to Provincetown, 78 MIles
[Msg#5652]


> <http://www.truerwords.net/5652>
> --------------------------------
>
> On 8/11/06, Steve Davis - Office said:
>
>> My only complaint is that when you want to "stretch your legs" and
>> increase
>> the speed by 3 or 4 miles per hour in 3 or 4 pedal strokes it makes it
>> tough
>> to keep the paceline moving smoothly.
>
> Thus, "HOLD THE LINE!!!" I knew you'd fess up eventually. ;-)
>
>> That's why I let you pull ahead on that stretch of road leading into
>> Provincetown. I figured if I jumped to stay up with you it would be
>> tough
>> on the group as a whole. and especially on the guy that was dropping back
>> off the front. (or at least that's my excuse for not being able to keep
>> up
>> with you there ;-).
>
> Yee haw. :-)
>
> Sometimes I just need to go. Don't you? (No, no, not like that. Settle
> down,
> children.)
>
>> My only other complaint about you
>
> Sorry, you can't have an "only complaint" followed immediately by another
> complaint. That's cheating.
>
>> is that when you get in your downhill tuck I get nightmares. You see, I
>> can't see around your big you know what. My fear is that one day you'll
>> stop short and I won't. The only way they'll find me is to see my shoes
>> sticking out the back of your shorts. I mentioned this to David on the
>> ferry and realized that several people were eavesdropping when the guys
>> behind us starting laughing uncontrollably...
>
> You're not exactly parking on a pinhead, buddy.
>
> Ok, ok, I had that coming for calling you Beef Jerky Man. :-)
>
> Gotta be honest, this had me laughing again, a few times, on my ride this
> evening. You're responsible for slowing me down a little. But not much (as
> you'll see in a minute).
>
> Seth
>
> --------------------------------
> Unsubscribe Instructions:
> <http://www.truerwords.net/mailinglist.html#unsubscribe>
>
>


[Top]


Author: Paul Yeomans

Date:8/14/2006

Permalink Icon

# 5659

The people you meet waiting at the Bridge

Hi Seth,

I just stumbled across your 2006 PMC diary. Very nice! I throughly enjoyed reading it. I share a love of bicycling like you so reading about your adventures this year was quite fun!

I also rode from the NY border (Hillsdale, NY - Rte 23) on Friday. I'm the guy that said "there are a lot of nice bikes here" on Sunday while we were waiting for our fellow riders to get over the bridge! What a small world?!

Yes, the guy I was talking to was a SNOT for making the comment about the number of nice bicycles that are behind him! Although he did point out that you forgot your helmet. I might not have caught it right away since I was so TIRED!

Anyway. Thank you for sharing your experience and happy cycling!

Paul Y.

[Top]


Author: Seth Dillingham

Date:8/14/2006

Permalink Icon

# 5661

Re: The people you meet waiting at the Bridge

On 8/14/2006, Paul Yeomans said:

> I just stumbled across your 2006 PMC diary. Very nice! I throughly enjoyed
> reading it. I share a love of bicycling like you so reading about your
> adventures this year was quite fun!

Very cool. I love that people keep finding it. :-)

How did you happen to "stumble across it"?

> I also rode from the NY border (Hillsdale, NY - Rte 23) on Friday.

Did you ride solo? Next year, maybe you could join the Huckleberries?

> I'm the guy that said "there are a lot of nice bikes here" on Sunday while
> we were waiting for our fellow riders to get over the bridge! What a small
> world?!

Small schmall! That's just plain cool. :-)

> Yes, the guy I was talking to was a SNOT for making the comment about the
> number of nice bicycles that are behind him! Although he did point out that
> you forgot your helmet. I might not have caught it right away since I was so
> TIRED!

TIRED is why I forgot it in the first place!

> Anyway. Thank you for sharing your experience and happy cycling!

You too, and thanks for saying hello.

Seth

[Top]



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